Gianluca Baio’s blog

Bayesian statistics, health economics and random stuff

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Yes. Definitely too much.

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To (almost) complete the very busy period of travelling and talks, this week I’m in Albacete, Castilla/La Mancha to take part in the conference of the Spanish Health Economic Society (AES). Andrea and I have been invited to give a pre-conference workshop on missing data in HTA, which we did today. I think it went well and I quite enjoyed it — we divided up the work so that I talked about the general aspects of Bayesian modelling in HTA and then the general problem of missing data, as well as a ridiculously short introduction to some of the most popular methods to deal with it.

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I’m (nearly) finished with our summer school in Florence — we only have tomorrow left, when Anna and I will speak a bit more about Value of Information (and specifically EVSI stuff). Howard and Chris have left (well, techinically, Howard will very early tomorrow, but he’s done teaching for this year). I have to say I’m pretty pleased with how it’s going (well… I could probably say “how it’s gone” at this stage): we had a slightly changed line-up of lecturers, but I think all has worked OK.

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Boby Mihaylova has two exciting posts available at the Health Economics Research Centre at the University of Oxford. In particular, she is looking for two R-minded researchers/analysts to develop work on disease modelling/cost-effectiveness using large individual-patients databases. In fact, I think it’s really good that they are explicitly including knowledge of R as part of the job specification — and they even ask R code as part of the application!).

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I am in Lyon for a couple of days for our annual Bayes 20XX/Bayesian Biostatistics conference. I couldn’t be here for the whole time, courtesy of exams period, but what I did see, I really enjoyed! There has been quite a number of good talks, including Sara on RDD (well… I probably would say that… But the talk was really good!). Two of Leo’s students presented some fascinating work on scientific reproducibility — Leo told me a while back he was starting a Center for Reproducible Research and clearly he got it going with interesting results.

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